Image of Grinnell Lake by Vik Ducken from Pixabay.

Here are some great places to view fall color.

Blodgett Canyon – this canyon near Hamilton, Montana, is a special place to see fall color as the trees put on their orange, red, and yellow show.  Many years ago, ice age glaciers flowed through the canyon and when they were no more, they left behind u-shaped valleys, carved granite mountains, cliffs, and cirques.  You will enjoy hiking the many trails through the canyon to see the trees turning, the leaves falling, waterfalls, Canyon Creek, and Blodgett Overlook.  Be on the lookout for wildlife too.  You will find the Blodgett Trailhead near the Blodgett Campground in the Bitterroot National Forest  https://www.fs.usda.gov/recarea/bitterroot/recarea/?recid=60308

Sluice Boxes Trail – As you will see, many of the best places to view the fall leaves is in state parks.  Sluice Boxes State Park covers the northern most 8 miles of Belt Creek Canyon.  This area, in the Little Belt Mountains south of Great Falls, was a thriving mining area at one time.  Today only two towns from the mining days remain and two more have become ghost towns.  The railroad bed that once supported trains carrying ore out of the mountains now serves as an access route to the park.  You will see soaring cliffs and ledges. It is not an easy place to hike, but if you like adventure, high rugged cliffs, fording creeks in cold water, trout fishing, viewing wildlife, and spectacular fall color, give this 7.5 mile hike a try.   https://www.visitmt.com/listings/general/state-park/sluice-boxes-state-park.html

Grinnell Lake – Found in the heart of Glacier National Park, your hike begins at the Many Glacier Hotel where you can hop on a shuttle boat that takes you across Swiftcurrent Lake. Next is a short hike up about 80 feet before descending back down to next shuttle boat that takes you across Lake Josephine where you proceed to Grinnell Lake.  You pass through quiet streams, pass small streams, cross a suspension bridge, look for thimbleberry patches, and see lakes, mountains and a glacier all named for George Bird Grinnell, an early American conservationist, explorer, and founder of the Audubon Society.  There are several trails to follow in this area.   http://www.hikinginglacier.com/grinnell-lake.htm